The Greatest Words You've Never Heard: True Stories of Triumph Buy the book

How to Defeat Your Inner Deadbeat?

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In every person’s life, there is a still, small voice that tries to guide you to a wonderful calling − a destiny. Your destiny. A calling that you, and only you, were put on this earth to fulfill. Near silent, this voice is powerful enough to lift thoughts, dreams and visions to a higher ground. Do you still hear it?

Batman Saved by a Cincinnati Love Story?

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When you were a little boy or girl you had this dream, you were going to change the world, restore honor, restore dignity. Remember? Did you follow your dream? And… who knew that without the love of a Cincinnati girl and her family, Batman and the Dark Knight would have never made it to the silver screen?

I Am Sam I Am: Meet the Intrigue Expert, Ms. Sam Horn

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How to Stand Out in Any Crowd by Sam Horn & Steve Kayser
: You, your product, your service, your company, is good … maybe great. It’s different, unique, totally rad, awesomeroo and bloggerific. It even (occasionally) delivers real business value; makes an authentic difference in business or life. But … no one has heard of you. You haven’t even heard of you! Here’s how to get your message out – or not. Featuring an interview with Sam Horn, author of “POP! Stand Out in Any Crowd.”

Thinking is Hard Work

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Is there a magic formula that can enable you to put your feet up in a chair, daydream and think of ideas that can change everything for you? In business and life? Yes, it’s “4 I’s > C2.” Features interview with Joey Reiman, author of “Thinking for a Living.”

An Inconvenient Genius

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How often has one person affected humanity to such a degree that were the fruits of his labor withdrawn immediately from our day-to-day existence, the world as we know it … would essentially stop?

The Seven “New Rules” of Business Presentations

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Having seen hundreds of business presentations and given a stinky few myself, there are a few things I wish someone would have taught me in kindergarten. Seven things or “New Rules” of business presentations to be precise. I pass these on to anyone new to the dreaded gauntlet of the business presentation or any grizzled veterans who want to walk on the wild side and shake things up. Avoid lying-flying “Stink-o-potamus” presentation status. Use the principle of “Creative Limitation.”

Doing the PowerPoint Punt

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Can you really give a presentation without PowerPoint slides? Maybe. It depends. The next presentation you give or attend, take note of what occurs after PowerPoint slide number five is swiped/swished onto the screen. Unless you really are “da man,” the Steven Spielberg of the sales presentation, 99 percent of the people in attendance will fall into one of the following descriptive categories:

Why Good Companies Go Bad How Great Leaders Remake Them

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You know the company. It’s yours, or may have been. An industry leader. Once. Competitors emulate it. Analysts preach the company gospel. The CEO’s mug is on every magazine cover. Stock prices soar above the Milky Way. Then

CRASH.

Why? Donald N. Sull, Harvard Business School Press author of “Revival of The Fittest: Why Good Companies Go Bad and How Great Managers Remake Them” answers that question in an easy-to-read “Shoot the Donkey” – style interview format, combining theory, real-life examples and practical advice.

Ten Tips for Being “Good in a Room” in the Complex Sale

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What is the one trait that’s an absolute “must have” to win the complex sale in today’s competitive sales environment? The skill is critical to your success – in business or life. You must be … “Good in a Room.” What does that mean? Stephanie Palmer, author of the book of the same name, “Good in a Room,” puts it in perspective.

The Power of Resistance: Lessons Learned from Bestselling Author Steven Pressfield

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I’ve had the good fortune to interview and work with many great storytellers over the last few years.  J.D. Meier, program manager for Microsoft’s Patterns & Practices team, and author of the “Sources of Insight”blog, asked me what the most important lessons I’d learned from the high-profile “working” writers and storytellers … the ones who actually make a living doing it.